March 11, 2014

Evil is "very relative"

So says writer Geoff Johns. Johns is the guy whose "Forever Evil" story arc in DC Comics features ... Superman arch-nemesis Lex Luthor joining the Justice League. This is the Lex Luthor who in contemporary comics does this sort of stuff:

  • Blows up a space shuttle just to make Superman look bad
  • Pushes his female assistant off a roof when she attempts to report the above
  • Looses one of his creations on a hapless security guard just to "test it out"
  • Said creation rips the security guard's head off
  • Threatens to kill a guy who won't sell his business
  • Drives said guy's wife to suicide by turning their son into a junkie
  • Kills five of his employees as a "test of loyalty"

But "evil is very relative."

Does anyone recall DC's (or Marvel's) "old fashioned" real heroes ever doing anything like that? I don't. Hell, if anything, the heroes were constantly grappling over the morality of actually following through and executing heinous villains -- villains that clearly deserved it. Just look at the classic DC Kingdom Come, for example, where Superman has taken the homicidal Joker into custody after a murder spree. Suddenly, one of the "new breed" of heroes, Magog, shows up and blasts the Joker to ashes for his crimes, right in front of the Man of Steel (see below). Magog's popularity skyrockets as a result of what he did, while Superman's approval rating plummets. Much of Kingdom tussles with the "appropriate measures" taken by the costumed vigilantes known as superheroes.

In the pages of the X-Men for the longest time the same debate took place. Storm, for one, refused to kill anything, even the savagely brutal Alien-esque Brood. Not to mention, the team perpetually struggled to keep the killing instincts of Wolverine in check. But this premise has long since gone out of date.

But, the above is what's actually a legitimate debate about the nature of "evil" and what to do about it, not declaring that "evil is very relative" and then showing one of your most vicious villains casually murdering people, followed by ... turning him into a "hero." It's also laughable how creators like Johns view evil as being "very relative," yet before Barack Obama's reign as president the nature of "evil" seemed quite clear to them:

  • Image Comics creator Erik Larsen said George W. Bush's "criminal activity dwarf[ed] Richard Nixon's by a wide margin," and "who cheated his way into the Oval Office -- twice"
  • Mr. Bush was "treated" to the superhero Savage Dragon slugging him in the face for his misdeeds
  • Artist Alex Ross sure showed who he thought was evil, and who was good ...
  • Superman enemy Lex Luthor, who was once elected president, cited "circumstantial evidence" as an excuse to invade the nation of "Qurac." Get it? Lex Luthor=George W. Bush, Qurac=Iraq.
  • Who can forget when Captain America went after the Tea Party?

Indeed. Evil wasn't "very relative" between 2000 and 2008. It was quite clear. Hell, Batman couldn't even go after al Qaeda -- AL QAEDA!! -- without there being a politically correct controversy, and when the creator of the tale, Frank Miller, morphed the story into one featuring a generic hero, he still got a ton of flak for it from "progressives."

Let's summarize:

Evil is "very relative." Unless a Republican sits in the White House.

Evil is "very relative." So relative so that one of the most popular superheroes ever cannot even go after the world's premiere terror organization, the one responsible for the deaths of 3,000 Americans.

Evil is "very relative." So much so that the current president gets comicbook "fist bumps," superhero endorsements, and numerous comicbook covers ... even though his lawlessness while in office equals and even surpasses that of his predecessor. That which these same creators didn't think were "very relative."

Guys like Geoff Johns are beyond boring already. The only thing "relative" to him and his comicbook cadre is how their stories will portray the political philosophy and party you agree/disagree with.

(Thanks to Nate for the tip to the original article.)

Posted by Hube at March 11, 2014 06:11 PM | TrackBack

Comments  (We reserve the right to edit and/or delete any comments. If your comment is blocked or won't post, e-mail us and we'll post it for you.)

Like a lot of progressives, modern comic creators don't simply view those who disagree with them as people, but as enemies that need to be silenced or exterminated.

And I'm not surprised that Geoff Johns would say that. He once stated in an interview that preferred villains over heroes. No joke. He's repeated his morally relativistic nonsense about "evil is relative" many times throughout the years.

How this clown was named "Chief Creative Officer" of DC, I'll never know. His Green Lantern run is vastly overrated. One of the reasons why the Green Lantern movie sucked was because he had direct involvement in it writing the screenplay.

Posted by: Carl at March 11, 2014 06:35 PM

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