November 17, 2007

Music education: It's helpful!

A recent poll indicates that Americans believe music education results in greater academic success as well as higher incomes.

Since I personally fit right into the parameters of this poll, I'll be the first to say that learning to play an instrument sure IS a good thing! Learning to read music assists one's math skills, and obviously, too, the growth of that right brain area! (That's the, um, creativity center of your noggin', natch.) By personal observation, the vast majority of my students that play an instrument (in the school band and elsewhere) are some of my best students.

Actually, one of my biggest regrets is not actively staying with music. My tenor sax remains in its case in my basement (case gathering dust), having only seen the light of day but a few times in the last decade. (But hey, I can get a nice coin if I ever decide to sell it; it's a Selmer Mark VI, one of the finest saxes ever made.) My bass guitar was donated to my school's music department years ago, and my school's jazz band's percussion section makes use of my old Peavy amplifier.

*Sigh*

Posted by Hube at November 17, 2007 09:38 AM | TrackBack

Comments  (We reserve the right to edit and/or delete any comments. If your comment is blocked or won't post, e-mail us and we'll post it for you.)

yes the Selmer was. I remember trading my Mark VII alto for a mark VI when I was growing up. Boy were my parents pissed :) They got over it. Although I no longer have the sax, I still stay somewhat active in music with participating in Dover area choral groups. With my 3 year old niece, we've bought her drums, a recorder (my first instrument) and for Christmas we're getting her a real (although small) guitar and a keyboard.

Posted by: Mark at November 18, 2007 05:01 AM

I think they're potentially confusing cause and effect. Perhaps those with a higher degree of musical aptitude are more inclined to pursue higher education.

Posted by: The Unabrewer at November 19, 2007 12:21 AM

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